Tag Archives: Twitter

Social Media for Musicians Vol. 2: Twitter!


So, you want to take your band to Twitter. Twitter boasts a whopping 500 Million users, so why shouldn’t it boast you? Twitter has rapidly, irreversibly shifted trends in online communication, and is an ideal platform for engaging your fans—and perhaps more importantly—finding new ones.

Twitter Basics:

Twitter champions brevity. Any message sent via Twitter is limited to 140 characters. They get used up fast, but you’d be amazed at how much info you can shoehorn in there with a little practice—more on that later. User connections are based on Follows, analogous to your Contacts list in your e-mail client or phone. When user X follows user Y, Y’s tweets will appear in X’s feed. This is a one-way street, and the inverse will not be true until Y follows X.

Any vanilla tweet you send out will appear in your follower’s feed. There are three other flavors of tweets:

@Tweets

Preceding your Tweet with the “@” character, as in “@PreSonus”, will create a publicly-viewable message directed at a particular user. It will show up in their feed regardless of who follows who, and is searchable on all of Twitter. The @Tweet will also show up in feeds of people who follow both the sender and recipient.

If you respond to a Tweet and you WANT the response to appear in the feeds of all your followers, simply place the @ later in your message, like “Thanks @PreSonus for the RT!”

ReTweets (RT)

A ReTweet is exactly what it sounds like. It copy/pastes another Tweet and sends it from your own account. If you find a Tweet from another user that you think your audience would enjoy, give it an RT. Keeping track of how many times a Tweet has been ReTweeted is a great way to measure how many people your message has reached.

Direct Messages:

Preceding your Tweet with “DM”, as in “DM @PreSonus,” sends a Direct Message. This is akin to an e-mail, and is not publicly viewable or searchable. You can only DM someone who follows you.

#Hashtags:

Hashtags are a sort of metadata tag. Think if it as assigning a category to your Tweet. This is a great way to find new followers who search Twitter for new music. So, if you release a new track (via @Nimbit, right?) and hashtag it with #NewMusic, said Tweet will appear to users who search for #NewMusic. Consider #Rock, #HipHop, #Country, #Recording, etc. Hashtagging has also gained prominence on Instagram, and more recently, Facebook.

Twitter.com interface

Twitter’s interface is pretty simple, and Twitter applications are available on mobile devices like cell phones. For now, we’ll look at the main Twitter.com page:

Home: Tweets from users you follow appear here.

@Connect: Tweets addressed directly to you via @ appear here.

#Discover: Tweets from users you may or may not follow, custom-tailored to your interests based on top-secret Twitter algorithms.

Me: Your Twitter page as seen by the world. This is where you will also view DMs.

Account setup:

Head on over to Twitter.Com and fill out the really simple form with your name, email, and choose a password. With 500 million users, there’s a chance the name you want is already taken. There’s no shame in adding the word “Band” or “Music” after your name.

Once you get an account created, Twitter will guide you through many of the basics covered here, but it’s still worth your time to see the lessons in context. They’ll have you follow some people to get the gist, but don’t stress if you aren’t a fan of these folks in real life—you can unfollow later.

You’ll also be prompted to import contacts via their e-mail addresses. I recommend this. Twitter can connect to e-mail services like Gmail to search your contacts for which of your friends or on Twitter.

Next, you will upload an image and write a bio. Keep it brief (well, you don’t really have a choice) but always include a link to your website in the bio. Setup complete!

Now that you’re all set up, let’s get some followers!

The best way to get followers is to join in on conversations and contribute content of value. You can do this using the #Discover tab referenced above and start talking to people! The second-best way to get followers is to follow them yourself, just don’t get too spammy with it, and only follow people who you think will actually like your music.

Get the word out

OK, you’ve got an account, a handsome photo and bio, and some followers. So what are you going to do with them all? Interact. Post show dates, pictures from your recording sessions, tales from the road, and links to new songs.

Get the most out of Twitter with Nimbit 

One of the most exciting factors of Nimbit’s Twitter integration is that it allows you to obtain your Twitter fans’ e-mail addresses. E-mail is more personal and direct than Twitter—not to mention the lack of a character limit—it’s more valuable than having access to your fans via Tweets. One of the best ways to build your e-mail list is via Nimbit’s Promo Tool.

Give away a free track via the promo tool, and an e-mail address will be required for your fans to start their download. This is found under the Marketing section of your Nimbit dashboard. The type of promo is up to you, offer a 50% discount off of a CD, free merch with purchase of music, etc. Your call!

Once you have your e-mail list set up, you can send your fans… anything. I recommend a thank-you follow-up, tour dates, new music and merch as you have it. Just don’t mass e-mail your fans more than, say, twice per month, as once you come across as spammy, you’re going to get folks unsubscribing to your list.

Here’s a video on how to set up promo codes in Nimbit that you can then Tweet or e-mail to your fans.

Viral love (the good kind)

There’s more to the one-two Nimbit/Twitter combo to just hoarding e-mail addresses. One way to look at Nimbit’s Twitter integration is that it elevates the fan community from just being fans to being an enthusiastic digital street team. When fans follow you on Twitter, the conversation is a two-way street. But, when you start sharing offers, discounts, and the like, they are much more likely to share these to their friends—because who doesn’t like free stuff? With this, the conversation is no longer a two-way relationship between you and your followers—the conversation becomes lateral, spreading your music and message to friends of friends who probably never would have heard of you otherwise. Further more, Twitter makes this whole process single-click easy for them. Remember the ReTweet mentioned earlier? Exactly.

So, instead of settling for a cliché, lukewarm, ”Thank you, goodnight, thanks for coming out, drive home safe,” at the end of a show, you are able to actually reward fans with gifts, which increases their devotion to your music immeasurably. In other words, it pays off to buy love.

Anyhow, getting back to Twitter proper: Have fun with it. Twitter isn’t about rules, but I recommend the following Dos/Don’ts.

Dos:

Follow back: If someone follows you, they like you. Following back is a show of respect and appreciation.

Hashtags: as mentioned before, this is where the party’s at. Opine on trends.

Lists: This is about as elaborate as Twitter gets, but over time, as you learn who your real supporters are, add them to a List. The list option is found on the Me tab. They will get an e-mail stating that they have been added to a list, which feels kinda special. Note that lists can be public or private, so if you want to keep track of trash-talkers, you want a private list called “haters,” not public. But the folks who like you? Create a public list called “Awesome Dudes” or somesuch. Worth noting is that Lists don’t allow you to simultaneously Tweet to the List—they are for reading Tweets.

Contact Journalists: Send your music to reviewers via Twitter, particularly local journalists in areas where you have shows coming up.

Leave room for the RT: I recommend against maxing out the 140 character limit all the time, because then the message cannot be Re-Tweeted, as your fan’s RT of your Tweet will contain “RT@MyUsername” at the beginning of the Tweet, taking it past the 140-character limit.

Shoehorn: Again, brevity. Use “3” instead of “three”, “&” instead of “and”, “cool” instead of “meritoriously commendable.”

Pix from the road: Let your fans into your band’s glamorous world of smelly vans, small dressing rooms, and moving heavy gear at 2:30 a.m.

Check in daily: Responding to a Tweet four days after the initial contact is lame. That’s  an eternity in the Twitter world.

Follow similar bands to access and engage their fans: Yeah, yeah, I know you’ve spent years dialing in a unique snowflake of a sound, but fact is there are bands out there you share sonic similarities or influences with. Start communicating with and following their fans, as these are the folks most likely to enjoy your music.

Don’ts:

Don’t be this bear.

Don’t make your account private: Make it easy for people to follow you. Private accounts require every follow to be hand-approved in order for your Tweets to be visible to them. Rather than cherry-picking who gets to follow you, the real answer here is to have a publicly-facing account where you don’t say anything stupid.

Don’t RT everything nice someone says about you. It’s self-aggrandizing and annoying. Better instead to Favorite these Tweets, and thank the person who Tweeted the nicety.

Don’t copy/paste/tweet the same thing multiple times per day, or even per week. Spammy and obnocious, it’s a sure way to lose followers, and a potential way to get your account reported for spam and potentially removed.

It’s not all business: Sure, you’re here to promote your music, but don’t simply talk about yourself all the time. Ever been to a party where some stranger just talked about himself all night? Yeah, don’t be that guy. But do be yourself.

Don’t make Twitter your only platform. 500 Million users is a lot, but it’s half of Facebook’s one B-b-b-billion users. Fact is Twitter still isn’t as mainstream as some would have you believe; 15% of online Americans are now on Twitter, and only 8% use it daily. So while you have the potential to reach a lot of people, you can’t reach them all here, or even ¼ of them.

Don’t be this guy. Via Perthnow.com.au

Don’t say anything stupid. Seriously. There are a million cases out there of tweets gone awry, and even if you delete the Tweet, users are quick to screencap embarrassing online moments. Consider Tweets permanent.

Don’t feed the trolls: If someone talks trash about you, big deal. Responding will only beget more trash talk, and probably more haters. Never forget that the Internet is bigger than you are.

Advanced Twitter:

Use bit.ly to track popular tweets and shorten links: Popular link-shortening service bit.ly reduces the length of links so they fit in a Tweet better, but more importantly, Bit.ly links track how many times the link has been clicked on, so you can measure your successes.

Use third-party apps: Once you know the ropes and are Tweeting like a pro, check out Hootsuite or TweetDeck for free, monster Twitter power. These apps allow you to sort twitter lists and searches by multiple columns, giving you a great overview of many trends and conversations simultaneously. You can also schedule Tweets in advance on these apps, which is great if you’re headed out on tour soon as you can set up all the “Here’s where we’re playing tomorrow” Tweets on the day you book the tour, instead of from the van during that burly 20-hour Bozeman to Chicago haul, where you will experience lapses in cellular service.

Followerwonk: Followerwonk allows you to search users by Twitter bio, a service no other app I know allows for. They also provide analytics.

Bringing it all together: Twitter plays nicely with others. You can, for example, link your Twitter account to your Facebook page, so your Tweets also go out as Facebook posts. We’ll look at this in greater detail in a later post.

 

 

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Facebook & Twitter Tips for Musicians

Checking the blogs this morning, I came across two articles with some good advice for musicians.  Here’s a summary.

In 5 Facebook Tips for Bands, Robin Davey recommends the following to reach more people on Facebook.

  1. Use plain text Facebook updates 
  2. Tag other Facebook pages in tweets
  3. Use your header or profile picture to make announcements
  4. Like every comment, reply to every question, and tag people
  5. Have band members accept fan requests and promote from those pages as well

This is all good advice, read 5 Facebook TIps for Bands on Hypebot  to explore these concepts in more detail.

 3 Types of Tweets That are Rarely Retweeted  provides some simple advice on how get your followers to help spread the word on Twitter.

  1. Don’t post automated (and usually truncated) Tweets from Facebook
  2. Don’t use more than two hashtags
  3. Whenever possible use proper formatting and grammar.  That means correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization, etc.

Read  3 Types of Tweets That are Rarely Retweeted courtesy of Ragan.com , a great resource for marketing and communication advice.

Leave a comment with your own advice.

For more music-centric social media advice check out the following articles from the Nimbit blog: 

 

 

 

 

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6 Easy Steps To Promote Music on Facebook & Twitter

We all know how important Facebook and Twitter can be to developing a deeper connection with your fans.   What’s not as obvious is what are the best ways  to use social networks  to promote your music or a new piece of merch, get new fans,  and turn those  ”Likes” and “Follows” into  music sales.  That’s why we created the new Roundtrip Promo Tool, which walks you through the process of promoting your music or merch on Facebook, Twitter, and more.

With Nimbit’s new Promo Tool, it will take you just a few minutes to set up a promotion and best of all, the Promo Tool  will automatically follow up for you with any fan who takes advantage of the promotion.

Check out how easy it is to set up a promotion:

Nimbit Promo Tool Step-by-Step

Click the image see how easy it is to promote yourself.

6 easy steps to Promote Music on Facebook & Twitter with Nimbit’s Roundtrip Promo Tool  

  1. Choose any product from your Nimbit catalog to promote and set whether you want to give it away for free, or sell it at a discount or full price.
  2. Add a link to an optional personal message or music video.  Don’t have a music video or professional video equipment? No problem, you would be surprised at how effective a video of you talking to your fans, filmed only with your phone’s camera can be. It seems more real.
  3. Set the store where you would like the promotion to redeem, this can be your Facebook store, nimbitmusic.com store, or any other URL you have your store embedded.
  4. Choose the time you would like your optional follow up thank you message to be sent and add the text of that message.  You can choose to have the follow up sent the next day, the next week.
  5. Set the date when you would like the promotion to expire
  6. Click in this section to send the promo out on your Facebook and Twitter accounts. Remember on Facebook you may want to click this twice to send to fans of your band/musician page and then also send again to your personal friends.  In this area you can also generate links and promo codes for email and download cards,and get the embed code for a widget to put on your website.
Here’s what your fans and friends will see on Facebook
Music Promotion on Facebook Wall

Fans can watch the video, click to get the promotion, like, comment, and share with friends

Fans and friends will see a personal message from you, a video (if you embedded one) and a link to access the promotion.  Please ignore the fact that the only people  who commented on my post were my mom and girlfriend :)

Here’s what your followers will see on Twitter

Music promotion on Twitter

Promotions on Twitter feature your personal message plus a link to redeem the promo

Here’s what an embeddable widget will look like

Fans click the link and the promotion redeems in your store
Nimbit Promotions Redeem in-store

Fans can preview the product,  click the link to get the promoted product or shop more

BONUS: When fans checkout they can leave additional support
Fans can leave additional support

Fans can choose to leave you additional support with every purchase or free download

With every purchase or free download on the Nimbit platform, fans are asked if they’d like to leave additional support . We’ve found 1-in-20  purchase on the Nimbit platform receive a tip averaging $7.80.
That was easy. Now try it yourself
Log in to your Nimbit Dashboard and click Marketing to set up your own promotion.
 
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6 Easy Steps To Promote Music on Facebook & Twitter

We all know how important Facebook and Twitter can be to developing a deeper connection with your fans.   What’s not as obvious is what are the best ways  to use social networks  to promote your music or a new piece of merch, get new fans,  and turn those  ”Likes” and “Follows” into  music sales.  That’s why we created the new Roundtrip Promo Tool, which walks you through the process of promoting your music or merch on Facebook, Twitter, and more.

With Nimbit’s new Promo Tool, it will take you just a few minutes to set up a promotion and best of all, the Promo Tool  will automatically follow up for you with any fan who takes advantage of the promotion.

Check out how easy it is to set up a promotion:

Nimbit Promo Tool Step-by-Step

Click the image see how easy it is to promote yourself.

6 easy steps to Promote Music on Facebook & Twitter with Nimbit’s Roundtrip Promo Tool  

  1. Choose any product from your Nimbit catalog to promote and set whether you want to give it away for free, or sell it at a discount or full price.
  2. Add a link to an optional personal message or music video.  Don’t have a music video or professional video equipment? No problem, you would be surprised at how effective a video of you talking to your fans, filmed only with your phone’s camera can be. It seems more real.
  3. Set the store where you would like the promotion to redeem, this can be your Facebook store, nimbitmusic.com store, or any other URL you have your store embedded.
  4. Choose the time you would like your optional follow up thank you message to be sent and add the text of that message.  You can choose to have the follow up sent the next day, the next week.
  5. Set the date when you would like the promotion to expire
  6. Click in this section to send the promo out on your Facebook and Twitter accounts. Remember on Facebook you may want to click this twice to send to fans of your band/musician page and then also send again to your personal friends.  In this area you can also generate links and promo codes for email and download cards,and get the embed code for a widget to put on your website.
Here’s what your fans and friends will see on Facebook
Music Promotion on Facebook Wall

Fans can watch the video, click to get the promotion, like, comment, and share with friends

Fans and friends will see a personal message from you, a video (if you embedded one) and a link to access the promotion.  Please ignore the fact that the only people  who commented on my post were my mom and girlfriend :)

Here’s what your followers will see on Twitter

Music promotion on Twitter

Promotions on Twitter feature your personal message plus a link to redeem the promo

Here’s what an embeddable widget will look like

Fans click the link and the promotion redeems in your store
Nimbit Promotions Redeem in-store

Fans can preview the product,  click the link to get the promoted product or shop more

BONUS: When fans checkout they can leave additional support
Fans can leave additional support

Fans can choose to leave you additional support with every purchase or free download

With every purchase or free download on the Nimbit platform, fans are asked if they’d like to leave additional support . We’ve found 1-in-20  purchase on the Nimbit platform receive a tip averaging $7.80.
That was easy. Now try it yourself
Log in to your Nimbit Dashboard and click Marketing to set up your own promotion.
 
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Video: Watch a Band Record, Sell & Promote a Song in Minutes

Here’s an archived webinar that we did with PreSonus last month. In the video we show you how easy it is to go from riff to release with Nimbit artists Down Up Speed. We start by doing a live recording with a Studio Live Mixer, and then in minutes, we we make the song available for sale on the artist’s Facebook page and promote it on Facebook and Twitter. Included in the presentation is some valuable advice on how to promote your music and communicate to fans by Nimbit VP of Marketing, Carl Jacobson.

Jump to :50 in the video below to get to the content.

Watch live streaming video from presonuslive at livestream.com
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Video: Watch a Band Record, Sell & Promote a Song in Minutes

Here’s an archived webinar that we did with PreSonus last month. In the video we show you how easy it is to go from riff to release with Nimbit artists Down Up Speed. We start by doing a live recording with a Studio Live Mixer, and then in minutes, we we make the song available for sale on the artist’s Facebook page and promote it on Facebook and Twitter. Included in the presentation is some valuable advice on how to promote your music and communicate to fans by Nimbit VP of Marketing, Carl Jacobson.

Jump to :50 in the video below to get to the content.

Watch live streaming video from presonuslive at livestream.com
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Nimbit Unveils First Roundtrip Promotion Tool for Musicians on Facebook & Twitter

Boston, MA, September 2012… Nimbit®, a PreSonus company, announced a major update to its Promo Tool for Facebook and Twitter. The Promo Tool will now boost artist sales by providing timed, automatic thank-you messages that include a product discount to fans who redeem free download promotions.

Nimbit Rountrip Promo Redemption

Fans act on a special offer, then receive a timed follow up offer or reward

Let’s face it, many artists lack follow-through and this is a big problem that has limited their success.  As direct-to-fan sales become ever more important to an artist’s survival, one thing sticks out more than ever: most artists are not natural marketers. Musicians want to spend their time making music, and after giving away their music, most don’t have the time, discipline, or know-how to follow up and capitalize on their newly captured fans.

To address this problem, Nimbit has unveiled the first of many new features that take a different approach to direct-to-fan tools.

Nimbit Roundtrip Promotion Set Up

Setting up a roundtrip promotion in the Nimbit dash is fast and easy

“We know that when artists follow up with an offer after giving away tracks, they create new sales from new fans, but not enough artists do that,” explains Nimbit president and cofounder Phil Antoniades. “We needed to make it easy for them to set up a promotion that will automatically follow up and drive a new fan to a sale. It’s up to us to create tools that drive best practices and create supportive customer relationships, and that’s the new vision that’s guiding the development of the Nimbit platform.”

Nimbit’s new Promo Tool walks the artist through setting up a variety of discounts, offers them an easy way to add a personalized video, and gives them a multitude of channels to push and promote their offer through Facebook, Twitter, email, text codes, and embeddable widgets. It then lets the artist set up an automated followup offer or reward with a personal message to further engage their fans and drive sales.

Some examples of how artists can use the Promo Tool include:

  • Sharing a free download and then automatically following up with a discount on the full album at a specified time
  • Offering a discount on an item, then rewarding fans who purchase with a thank you message and a free bonus

The Nimbit Promo Tool is available in both NimbitFree and NimbitPlus accounts. NimbitFree customers are limited to only one active promotion at a time. For more information or to sign up, please visit www.nimbit.com.

***

About Nimbit – Nimbit, a PreSonus company, is the industry’s premier direct-to-fan commerce and promotion platform. Nimbit provides the easiest solution for self-managed artists, managers, churches, schools and universities to sell and promote music, audio, merchandise, and more while simultaneously enabling artists to build relationships with fans and supporters. For more information, please visit www.nimbit.com.

About PreSonus Audio Electronics, Inc. – Founded in 1995, PreSonus Audio Electronics, Inc., is a leading designer and manufacturer of audio-recording software, hardware, and related accessories. PreSonus’s software, microphone preamps, signal processors, digital audio interfaces, mixers, control surfaces, and other products are used worldwide for recording, sound reinforcement, broadcast, sound design, and Internet audio.

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Nimbit Unveils First Roundtrip Promotion Tool for Musicians on Facebook & Twitter

Boston, MA, September 2012… Nimbit®, a PreSonus company, announced a major update to its Promo Tool for Facebook and Twitter. The Promo Tool will now boost artist sales by providing timed, automatic thank-you messages that include a product discount to fans who redeem free download promotions.

Nimbit Rountrip Promo Redemption

Fans act on a special offer, then receive a timed follow up offer or reward

Let’s face it, many artists lack follow-through and this is a big problem that has limited their success.  As direct-to-fan sales become ever more important to an artist’s survival, one thing sticks out more than ever: most artists are not natural marketers. Musicians want to spend their time making music, and after giving away their music, most don’t have the time, discipline, or know-how to follow up and capitalize on their newly captured fans.

To address this problem, Nimbit has unveiled the first of many new features that take a different approach to direct-to-fan tools.

Nimbit Roundtrip Promotion Set Up

Setting up a roundtrip promotion in the Nimbit dash is fast and easy

“We know that when artists follow up with an offer after giving away tracks, they create new sales from new fans, but not enough artists do that,” explains Nimbit president and cofounder Phil Antoniades. “We needed to make it easy for them to set up a promotion that will automatically follow up and drive a new fan to a sale. It’s up to us to create tools that drive best practices and create supportive customer relationships, and that’s the new vision that’s guiding the development of the Nimbit platform.”

Nimbit’s new Promo Tool walks the artist through setting up a variety of discounts, offers them an easy way to add a personalized video, and gives them a multitude of channels to push and promote their offer through Facebook, Twitter, email, text codes, and embeddable widgets. It then lets the artist set up an automated followup offer or reward with a personal message to further engage their fans and drive sales.

Some examples of how artists can use the Promo Tool include:

  • Sharing a free download and then automatically following up with a discount on the full album at a specified time
  • Offering a discount on an item, then rewarding fans who purchase with a thank you message and a free bonus

The Nimbit Promo Tool is available in both NimbitFree and NimbitPlus accounts. NimbitFree customers are limited to only one active promotion at a time. For more information or to sign up, please visit www.nimbit.com.

***

About Nimbit – Nimbit, a PreSonus company, is the industry’s premier direct-to-fan commerce and promotion platform. Nimbit provides the easiest solution for self-managed artists, managers, churches, schools and universities to sell and promote music, audio, merchandise, and more while simultaneously enabling artists to build relationships with fans and supporters. For more information, please visit www.nimbit.com.

About PreSonus Audio Electronics, Inc. – Founded in 1995, PreSonus Audio Electronics, Inc., is a leading designer and manufacturer of audio-recording software, hardware, and related accessories. PreSonus’s software, microphone preamps, signal processors, digital audio interfaces, mixers, control surfaces, and other products are used worldwide for recording, sound reinforcement, broadcast, sound design, and Internet audio.

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Tech Crunch describes Nimbit as the anti-buzz-kill for the music industry

Tech Crunch describes Nimbit as the anti-buzz-kill for the music industry

Last week, we announced the closing of an additional $1.25 million in funding, and the news is generating some buzz from top tech news sites such as Tech Crunch and BostInnovation.

Rip Empson of Tech Crunch, who calls Nimbit “a one-stop shop for musicians looking to manage TechCrunch Logotheir own direct-to-fan marketing and commercial music efforts,” acknowledges the fact that the business side of music can be a hassle for many musicians, and recommends Nimbit as the panacea, saying “Nimbit removes the time-consuming (and total buzz-killing) commercial aspects of musical enterprise.”

Empson continues: “Quite a few musicians that I know dislike the business side of music and, as seems true of many creative-types, they end up either refusing to participate or do so grudgingly, which makes me think that Nimbit’s services could be very useful to the troubadours and crooners among us — whether they deal in death metal, dub step, or heady acoustic stylings. Plus, the Web is killing (or has killed) traditional music labels, so why not just automate and digitally outsource the process? I know I will.”

BostInnovation Logo

Cheryl Morris of BostInnovation agrees that direct-to-fan has emerged as the new model for the music industry.

“Most artists, no matter their level, now realize direct-to-fan is essential to their success. Nimbit’s ‘all-in-one’ platform is built just for this, integrating across the multitude of channels artists now have available to connect with and sell to fans including email, Facebook, MySpace, and even Twitter,” she said.

Read the full articles on Tech Crunch & BostInnovation.

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The Ping Potential

The minions in Apple-dom gathered at the cyberfeet of their master to receive his words of wisdom.  Within moments,  waves of pleasure spread through the Internet as King Steve decreed that we shall heretofore network on Ping.  The news was met with mass adulation as the joyous news reached far and wide across his mighty dominion.

Within moments of the momentous proclamation, all the kings horses and all the kings men were trying to figure out what Ping actually meant for musicians.

Here’s what we know:

  • iTunes users can create their own Ping profiles, list their favorite tracks, post reviews, and have their purchases displayed.
  • You can follow others and see their recommendations display in a feed similar to your wall on Facebook.
  • You can post comments on their activities/purchases, and make a purchase based directly from their screen.
  • Concert tickets are available for purchase from select artist profiles.

Here’s what we’re hoping to see:

  • Custom artist profiles for any artist.
  • Total integration with external platforms.  Share purchases/updates with Twitter and Facebook and manage the page from an external source (like inside your Nimbit account!).
  • External feeds piped into and out of Ping.  Be able to syndicate blog posts and updates from outside sources right onto your Ping profile.

There are bunches of articles being written about the pros, cons, and potential of Ping.  Here’s one we like from Digital Music News.  Right now, we’re waiting eagerly for answers from Apple.  When that info becomes available, you’ll hear it from us along with the best ways to integrate Ping into a successful music career.

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